100% New Mexico Initiative

100% POWER HOUR

THREE: ACTING AS A CHANGE AGENT

PLEASE NOTE: This page contains supplemental information for attendees of the 4-part 100% New Mexico initiative power hours. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Please register here.

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We are providing the slides and narrative text used in the 100% Power Hour: Acting as a Change Agent being offered quarterly by the Anna, Age Eight Institute. The 4-part webinar series is designed to give 100% New Mexico initiative members an overview of key concepts and issues related to implementing the initiative in their county. Currently nine counties are engaged in the initiative.

Power Hour participants are encouraged to use this page for local presentations in order to increase public awareness of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), trauma, social adversity and the data-driven prevention strategies.

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Before we begin our presentation, we want to allow for a moment of quiet reflection. Please take a minute to perform the self-care of your choice.

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PART ONE: HOW CAN WE TAKE ACTION?

The 100% New Mexico initiative, like many health initiatives across the country, has many moving parts. It also has a book to guide all initiative participants, a framework for change and one very clear vision: 100% of families and communities can thrive with access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving.

This presentation will provide an overview of how we are taking action to design, build, expand and run the services that make all the communities within a county’s borders truly family-friendly.

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The 100% Power Hour 4-part webinar series was developed to provide initiative participants with an overview of key concepts that guide the initiative. This includes the detailed initiative programming to empower local county and city stakeholders as they address challenges through the process of continuous quality improvement: assess, plan, act and evaluate. Today we focus on action and being a change agent.

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As we begin, we wish to point out three of the most common comments we hear as we discuss the initiative. Some local government representatives will say, “We can’t afford that.” Our response is, “How do we change funding priorities?” Local agency representatives might say, “We don't have the capacity.” We respond, “How can we help you build capacity to serve families?” And some change agents might say, “What do we do when we get a big, ‘No!’”?” We respond, “First we understand that getting buyin is not always easy. Second, we have work arounds.” As change agents, we are not waiting for permission to end trauma and adversity.

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The goal of the data-driven, county-based and technology-fueled initiative is to empower local stakeholders in ensuring ten vital services for surviving and thriving, all key components of a county and city committed to health equity and racial justice.

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The learning objectives of 100% Power Hour #3: Being a Change Agent are participants completing the webinar will be able to describe an overview of: the action process, being a change agent, resources for action, funding action, qualities of effective action, buy-in for action and a shared vision for action.

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REFLECTION QUESTION: What does the term “change agent” mean to you?

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PART TWO: WHO HAS THE TIME AND ENERGY TO BE A CHANGE AGENT?

There are important questions to ask, within the context of the 100% New Mexico initiative. One simple one is, “Which local stakeholders in your county have the time and energy to be a change agent?” Another equally important question is, “Who working within the city, county and state government can work within the initiative as part of their job?” Lastly, how do county initiatives write and fund proposals to create new positions focused on coordination of 100% action projects?

The action process begins after a county-wide survey and planning process is completed. It is the action phase where the county-based initiative’s ten action teams become project developers.

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Part Two begins with a definition of action: The process of doing something, typically to achieve an aim. The definition of change agent is: a person who helps an organization, community, city, or county to transform how it operates. A change agent can be a catalyst for change, a person who can make changes happen by inspiring and influencing others.

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We understand the stakes. We know from our countywide survey how many families are depending on our work to ensure vital services. Our action teams have assessed the challenges and made plans to solve them. Action, in the form of project development, awaits.

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Change agents work on our three key strategies: 1) creating a central hub for services, 2) making every school a service hub, and 3) ensuring internet access across the county to make web-based services a reality.

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The entire initiative follows the continuous quality improvement process, moving from assessment to planning to action to evaluation. In the action phase projects are funded and initiated. This might mean installing new software so every food pantry in the county can track supply and demand. It might mean building a school-based health center to transform a school into a community school. It could mean, with a new partnership between the city and county, building the 100% Family Center: a one-stop shop that houses all the services for surviving and thriving in the center of town.

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With a completed countywide survey, the county-based 100% New Mexico initiative members will be able to share with elected leaders in local government the challenges families endure and the need to end service barriers. We can discuss the return on investment and the benefits of having healthy, trauma-free children who become successful students, job-ready and tax-paying employees.

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REFLECTION QUESTION: How can you build the capacity for your initiative to take action?

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PART THREE: WHAT ARE OUR SEVEN STEPS?

Potential partners are, like all of us, bombarded with requests to join coalitions, causes and put time into various work-related activities. We need to be able to give a three-minute elevator pitch, but instead of selling a movie idea we are promoting a groundbreaking initiative. The goal of the pitch is to engage local partners in the initiative and support our seven key steps.

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STEP 1: SURVEY YOUR COUNTY RESIDENTS

Initiative teams implement a countywide survey that assesses resident’s access to 10 vital services for surviving and thriving (like health care, transport and job training) and why barriers exist. You’ll learn that different populations will have different challenges.

How are our families surviving?

Initiative teams are surveying families across their county, getting the answers about gaps in vital services.

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STEP 2: REVIEW SURVEY RESULTS

Initiative teams review the survey data to learn what percentage of county residents struggle to access vital services, and why challenges accessing services exist and where they exist in the county. You can review the data from the countywide survey, especially the barriers to accessing services. Each barrier (such as unfriendly hours, lack of transport to services) will require analysis and a plan to address it.

What are barriers to services?

Initiative teams are analyzing survey results to identify where barriers to vital services exist and why.

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STEP 3: ASSESS THE TEN SURVIVING AND THRIVING SERVICES

Initiative teams, including ten action teams created (each one focused on one sector such as food or medical care) learn about the capacity of current services in all 10 surviving and thriving sectors. The goal is to understand challenges service organizations face when meeting the needs of county residents.

What’s the capacity of providers?

Initiative teams are assessing why service providers and organizations struggle to meet local needs and how to increase their capacity. Explore the San Miguel 100% initiative and other initiatives across New Mexico.

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STEP 4: ENSURE THAT A COUNTY DIRECTORY TO TEN VITAL SERVICES EXISTS

Each of the county’s ten action teams update an existing online directory to services or create a new updated directory guiding residents to the ten vital services. (Note that directories will need local monitoring and updating based on changes in services due to COVID-19).

How do families find support?

Initiative teams are designing directories and constantly updating them to provide accurate information. Visit the new directory for San Miguel County.

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STEP 5: IDENTIFY INNOVATIVE POLICIES AND PROGRAMS TO FIX BARRIERS TO ACCESSING TEN SERVICES

To address the barriers identified in the countywide survey, initiative teams learn about innovations in all ten sectors that can increase access, user-friendliness and quality of services. The book 100% Community and the @100% book series on each of the ten sectors offer many potential innovative strategies to reduce gaps in services and strengthen a countywide system of support. The EYE ON SOLUTIONS website also serves as a repository for evidence-informed strategies shown to reduce service barriers. Action Teams can review and prioritize innovations.

How do we ensure access?

Initiative teams are exploring a menu of evidence-informed strategies to ensure all residents can access services.

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STEP 6: GET BUY-IN FROM LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND STAKEHOLDERS TO SUPPORT INNOVATION THAT ENSURES 100% OF COUNTY RESIDENTS HAVE ACCESS TO TEN VITAL SERVICES

Initiative teams identify, support and implement innovations including new technologies, local policies, programs and agency protocols. This is the action phase that requires project management and ongoing tracking of local innovation in ten sectors.

How do we engage local leaders?

Initiative teams are strengthening partnerships with local elected leaders and stakeholders, working in alignment. We engage leaders through relationship-building and dialogue. We share survey results and the cost of ACEs and social adversity.

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STEP 7: EVALUATE EFFECTIVENESS OF EACH INNOVATION AND MEASURE THE INCREASE IN ACCESS TO TEN VITAL SERVICES

Initiative teams measure the impact of innovations on all ten surviving and thriving services with feedback from residents and providers. We work to ensure that our local work on each innovation is moving the needle on improving access to services so that 100% of residents thrive.

How do we track progress?

Initiative teams are using a variety of tools to ensure that they can measure meaningful progress.

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Securing local investment can end barriers. Change agents work to develop the resources to support action team projects and end service barriers. It is not a question of if the government has the resources. They do. It is a question of how current resources are prioritized.

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The 100% New Mexico initiative in each county can design a new future, one where our action is measurable and meaningful. Change agents use a data-driven process, moving from assessment to planning to action, all focused on developing projects that reduce service barriers. Change agents are strategic and understand local politics. Change agents understand that change requires building relationships and getting buy-in from stakeholders.

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Local initiatives work to build support from city and county government elected leaders. Our potential funding sources for projects including city government, county government, state government, federal government and philanthropy. These are multi-million (or multi-billion) dollar entities.

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The county initiative teams are building and strengthening relationships with a variety of partners on the state, county and city levels. The partners are key to securing funding and support for local 100% New Mexico projects. We do not lack funding for projects to end service barriers, instead we lack making access to all a priority of government.

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REFLECTION QUESTION: What support would help you in identifying funding sources for the initiative and local projects?

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PART FOUR: HOW DOES YOUR TEAM GET BUY-IN TO TURN PLANS INTO ACTION?

Each county initiative will require financial support and resources to end barriers in ten service areas. There are many ways to secure buy-in from local stakeholders. There are also many ways to turn a “no” into a “yes” when asking for support. And getting a “no” is a normal part of the change process.

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In our “Framework for Change” action is the “D” part of the four-phase continuous quality improvement process. Action, including fundraising, is all part of the change process that leads us to “E” and engagement. This means leadership and a local movement committed to our desired result: 100% of our kids and families thrive.

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We return to a core value of the initiative from the collective impact model: With a shared vision, anything is possible. If you can envision a school-based health center serving students and families, you can be the change agent to make it a reality with your team. If you can envision a 100% Family Center in your county, you can make it a reality with key partnerships.

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We stress that change is not a matter of “if” but “when.” As change agents we are driven by a passion for health equity, justice and fairness to move our local communities from the world of “we can’t” to the world of “we can.” (Ask about the training on “adaptive leadership” that empowers change agents, especially when the nay-sayers seek to stop projects before they start.)

The Anna, Age Eight Institute can help all county initiatives to achieve their goals.

Moving from “we can’t” to “we can” is all about having the bold vision.

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Every challenge that we and our families and communities face has been solved somewhere else. Don’t doubt the power of local change agents guided by the vision of 100% of our children thriving.

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REFLECTION QUESTION: Who in your county has experience with taking action, project implementation and turning a “no” into a “yes”?

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NEXT STEPS: Reflect on the presentation and your notes. Review the books and links to research provided. Reach out to colleagues, friends, family, neighbors and local elected leaders to discuss the 100% New Mexico initiative. We have designed this presentation so that it can be used with local elected officials within city and county government and school board members, agency leaders (representing the ten vital services), representatives from local higher education, faith-based and community-based organizations and your neighbors and friends.

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Visit the 100% New Mexico website to access local 100% New Mexico sites across the state, research, data, podcasts, our blog and frameworks.

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Subscribe to our 100% Blog with articles on challenges, opportunities and local successes with county initiatives.

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The next 100% Power Hour is Evaluating Change. We hope to see you there. For any questions about the 4-part webinar series, the initiative, research guiding the process or practical steps in starting the initiative, please contact us annaageeight@nmsu.edu.

Additional Resources

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