100% New Mexico Initiative

100% POWER HOUR

100% Ready Workshop

PLEASE NOTE: This page contains supplemental information for attendees of the 7-part 100% New Mexico initiative power hours. Attendance is free, but registration is required. Please register here. This page also guides local readiness workshops for county initiatives.

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100% NEW MEXICO INITIATIVE: STRATEGY

100% Ready Workshop

We are providing the slides and narrative text used in the 100% Ready webinar being offered by the Anna, Age Eight Institute. The webinar is designed to give 100% New Mexico initiative members an overview of key concepts and issues related to implementing the initiative in their county with a focus on strengthening the community schools model in each county. Currently ten counties are engaged in the initiative.

Webinar participants are encouraged to enroll in the 100% Power Hour webinar series for more background in the initiative. We also invite you to use this page for local presentations in order to increase public awareness of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), trauma, social adversity and the data-driven prevention strategy of community schools.

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Before we begin our presentation, we want to allow for a moment of quiet reflection. Please take a minute to perform the self-care of your choice.

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The learning objectives of the 100% Ready webinar are that participants completing the webinar will be able to describe an overview of: the 100% New Mexico initiative, health and safety challenges families endure do to the impact of ACEs, trauma and social adversity; the one-stop service hub model; the power of partnerships to enhance service delivery of ten vital services for surviving and thriving; funding streams and return on investment; and getting started.

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Participant Guidelines: The 100% Power Hour process is designed to create a vehicle for building awareness of the initiative and serve as a catalyst for ongoing local community dialogue. The presentation design follows the “teach the teacher” format, developed to allow participants to provide the presentation to their initiative members and local stakeholders. To create an environment for community dialogue, we offer simple guidelines.

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Acknowledgements: We acknowledge the contribution of all initiative members across the state who have been part of the iterative process of developing the 100% New Mexico initiative to meet the unique needs of rural and urban families, as well as those serving culturally and economically diverse populations in the south and west. We also are grateful to the state and local lawmakers who have supported the initiative.

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PART ONE: 100% New Mexico initiative: Challenges and Solutions

The 100% New Mexico initiative, like many health initiatives across the state and country, seeks to prevent the costly challenges that diminish the lives of children, students and adults. We don’t lack data that documents our students’ health and safety challenges. Every state department of health provides data on the incidence of illness, injury and violence, along with reports that detail our students’ troubling experiences with challenges outside the home. We don’t lack data to illustrate how many of our students are struggling with schoolwork or dropping out. We know the risk for ongoing substance use disorders, violence, untreated mental health challenges and joblessness.

We are united in ensuring that 100% of county residents have access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving. This presentation will provide an overview of the key concepts guiding the initiative.

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The 100% New Mexico initiative is the centerpiece of the Anna, Age Eight Institute’s programming. It was developed by institute co-directors Katherine Ortega Courtney, PhD and Dominic Cappello who are the co-authors of Anna, Age Eight and 100% Community.

Anna, Age Eight: The data-driven prevention of childhood trauma and maltreatment guides communities in addressing epidemic rates of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) that occur in the home and social adversity that families face outside their door. The book also addresses the role of schools in preventing adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and trauma.

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100% Community: Ensuring 10 vital services for surviving and thriving is the blueprint that 100% New Mexico initiative participants are using to assess barriers to vital service and build a countywide system of care that includes timely access to vital services. The book details how we collaborate to build the services in each county. One of the ten vital services would be a fully-resourced community school.

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The 100% New Mexico initiative is working, county by county, to ensure the ten vital services for surviving and thriving. Our children, students and families can only struggle without these services shown to increase health, safety and resilience for residents of all ages. The initiative aligns the local work of county and city leaders committed to health equity and racial justice.

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Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are ten forms of adversity, abuse and neglect that children endure in the home. As we begin, we wish to point out as many as a fourth to half our students are enduring the ten ACEs. Even those students who may be fortunate enough to score a 0 on the ten-question ACEs survey navigate a homelife, school and community of those with much higher scores.

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The impact of ACEs does not stay in the home. Almost all our costly health and social challenges can be traced back to ACEs, trauma and the ways people cope with damaged families. Adults with untreated trauma due to ACEs can struggle to learn, parent, work and become a contributing member of the community.

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Social adversity arrives once one steps outside their door. Adversity in the form of service barriers, discimination, lack of access to the internet and living in areas without good paying jobs can diminish the lives of children, students, parents, caregiving grandparents and all county residents.

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Our initiative is guided by a “Framework for Change.” In our “Framework for Change” action is the “D” part of the four-phase continuous quality improvement process. Action, including fundraising, is all part of the change process that leads us to “E” and engagement. This means leadership and a local movement committed to our desired result: 100% of our kids and families thrive.

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The county initiative teams are building and strengthening relationships with a variety of partners on the state, county and city levels. The partners are key to securing funding and support for local 100% New Mexico projects.

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Change agents work on our three key strategies: 1) creating a 100% Family Center which is a “one-stop shop” and central hub for ten vital services, 2) making every school a fully-resourced community school which serves as a service hub with ten services, and 3) ensuring internet access across the county to make web-based services and supports a reality.

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REFLECTION QUESTION: As you think about the problems and solutions presented in the initiative overview, take a few moments to reflect on what challenges you see associated with the initiative.

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PART TWO: What are the key concepts guiding the initiative?

The first concepts represent the “what,” meaning “what challenges do our county residents face?” Instead of one challenge, there are many that collide in a variety of ways. Some challenges for the 100% New Mexico initiative to address appear inside the home while others greet people as they step outside their front door.

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Concept 1: Mission

Almost every costly social problem you can think of can be traced back to adverse childhood experiences and social adversity. It’s a long list of costly challenges to tax payers that include child maltreatment, substance use disorders, domestic violence, sexual assault, poor school achievement and school drop out, lack of job readiness, untreated mental health challenges and suicidal ideation, malnutrition, overburdened law enforcement, courts, child welfare and ER services, and workforces without skilled employees.

Instead of ignoring the cost of historical trauma, disparities and barriers to vital services, we are investing in a new future, one where all children and families are trauma-free. We are committed to building schools and communities that are fully-resourced to promote health, safety and resilience. The 100% New Mexico initiative’s mission is to ensure that 100% of our children, students, parents and caregiving grandparents have the vital services to thrive.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe why an initiative focused on ensuring vital services is needed
  2. Describe consequences to children and families if we keep a status quo with health disparities and barriers to vital services
  3. Describe what the benefits of the 100% New Mexico initiative could be to your county

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 1: 100% of Us Can Move From Crisis to Community—Together”

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Concept 2: Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs)

This concept focuses on the complex world of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs). This is a field of study that came into public awareness in 1998 with the publication of the ACEs Study by Drs. Felitti and Andra, working in collaboration with the US Centers for Disease Control. ACEs are ten forms of abuse and neglect that children endure in their homes, controlled by parents and other adults. ACEs can lead to being in a state of fight or flight 24/7. ACEs and the trauma that may result from ten forms of abuse and neglect does not necessarily end in childhood. ACEs may impact an adult's physical and emotional health, capacity to learn, ability to be job ready and keep a job, and be a caring parent. During a public health crisis or economic disruption, people with high ACEs scores may feel especially insecure and destabilized.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe how adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) impact family life
  2. Describe consequences of ACEs and trauma on our students and learning
  3. Describe consequences of ACEs and trauma on job readiness and workplace performance

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 7: We Interrupt this Public Health Crisis to Share Another One”

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Concept 3: Social Adversity

Social adversity are the challenges a person, of any age, faces when they step out their front door. These challenges are rooted in access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving. Lack of access and reasons for disparities are a focus as we discuss social adversity.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe examples of social adversity facing residents
  2. Describe root causes of social adversity
  3. Describe how local leaders, either by action or inaction, allow social adversity to exist

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 3: Proving our Hypothesis”

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Concept 4: Social Determinants of Health

The social determinants of health is a field of study that explores how a person’s community environment can impact their physical and emotional health and opportunities with learning, work and wealth. The social determinants of health are the services and technology people have access to in order to improve their lives.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the social determinants of health and how access to services impacts a person
  2. Describe how the ten vital services that the initiative is working to ensure could be considered components of the social determinants of health
  3. Describe how local leaders, either by action or inaction, impact the social determinants of health in all the communities within your county’s borders

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 3: Proving our Hypothesis”

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Concept 5: Historical Trauma

Historical trauma and historical disparities are fields of study documenting centuries of social injustice and all the “isms” (such as racism) you’re familiar with to describe the unfair treatment of people. When we talk about community environments and who does or doesn’t have easy access to vital services, we will be talking about how one’s zip code can determine to a large degree one’s destiny. Disparities based on geographic location, is something written about in Anna, Age Eight: “Chapter 7: Why your zip code should not determine your destiny.” Historical Trauma is written about in 100% Community and details why each 100% New Mexico initiative has a Task Force on Historical Trauma and Historical Resilience. We explore how challenging it can be to address and discuss these concepts.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe historical disparities in your county or region
  2. Describe historical trauma in your county or region
  3. Describe how local leaders, either by action or inaction, impact the capacity of people to address historical disparities and historical trauma

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 33: Knowing Historical Disparities, Historical Trauma and Resilience”

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Concept 6: Ten Services for Surviving and Thriving

Ten services for surviving and thriving, coined in the book 100% Community, are the focus of this initiative. Our goal is to ensure that five services for surviving are available to 100% of county residents. These include medical and dental care, mental health care, food security programs, housing security programs and transportation. These are the services that none of us can do without, as they provide the foundation for health, safety, resilience and clarity of mind.

Five thriving services are parent supports, early childhood learning programs, fully-resourced community schools with health centers, youth mentors and job training aligned with future job markets.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the local need the ten services for surviving and thriving
  2. Describe the types of local organizations who deliver the services
  3. Describe how local leaders, either by action or inaction, impact access to each of the ten services

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Part 4: Chapters 41-45 (Surviving services)”
100% Community: “Part 5: Chapters 46-50 (Thriving services)”

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Concept 7: A County-focused Approach

The 100% New Mexico initiative is a county-based project. This means that it focuses on ensuring ten vital services within all cities, towns and communities within a county’s borders. We are guided by a variety of models, theories and framework to take on such a monumental task of ensuring ten vital services for 100% of residents across an entire county.

We chose the county model for some very pragmatic, economic and political reasons. One reason is that it allows for the development of sustainable funding streams to support the initiative, including the “1% for 100% funding formula,” in which 1% of a county and city governments' budget is earmarked for local 100% New Mexico activities.

On a countywide scale, we can do the following:

  1. Assessment: identify service gaps in the county and why they exist
  2. Planning: research solutions; create public-private sector partnership to fix gaps in all communities within a county’s borders
  3. Action: collaborate and innovate with technology, to ensure ten services meet the needs of 100%, including creating the businesses and jobs of the future
  4. Evaluation: track all projects and what county residents report access to, and user-friendliness of, ten vital services

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of an initiative working within a county's borders
  2. Describe how the agencies that deliver the ten vital services align services and communicate across a county
  3. Describe how to identify the budgets of county and city government and the elected leaders who control local budgets

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Introduction: (segment) 'Thinking Global, Fixing Local'”

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REFLECTION QUESTION: What questions might you have about the concepts thus far—mission, adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), social adversity, determinants of health, historical trauma,10 surviving and thriving services, and benefits of a county-based initiative?

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PART THREE: Frameworks guiding us

The mission of the 100% New Mexico initiative is to empower local champions to create access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving for 100% of county residents. This is a groundbreaking goal, never attempted in the nation before. To do this important work, the initiative is guided by three frameworks/models.

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Concept 8: Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI)

The initiative and all the projects developed to end barriers to vital services are guided by a data-driven process called continuous quality improvement framework. The four-phase process, used for more than a half a century in the private and public sectors, includes four phases: assessing, planning, acting and evaluating.

On a countywide scale, the initiative and its ten action teams (each one focused on a surviving and thriving service sector) can do the following:

  1. Assessment: identify service gaps in the county and why they exist. This is done by collecting data through a countywide survey of residents asking, “To what degree do you have access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving?”
  2. Planning: research evidence-informed solutions to end barriers to ten services. These are strategies that have been shown (through evaluation and measuring results of a particular policy or program) to increase access for residents of all ages and income levels.
  3. Action: collaborate and innovate with technology, to ensure ten services meet the needs of 100%, including creating the businesses and jobs of the future. This process is monitored closely to ensure that new strategies to increase service access are tested for user-friendliness.
  4. Evaluation: track all projects with a variety of assessment tools and processes, and report back to all county stakeholders and progress.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of having framework like CQI to guide project development
  2. Describe how action team members can be recruited to support the CQI process in developing projects to end service barriers.
  3. Describe why there might be push-back from governmental and nongovernmental organizations to using a data-driven process like CQI?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 29: Continuous Quality Improvement Guides Us with Data”

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Concept 21: Collective Impact

The local 100% New Mexico initiative is following the collective impact model with the following components: a shared vision and goals, and shared understanding of how data will be used, the communications strategies to build public awareness and create buyin for projects, and how all local projects focused on ending barriers are interrelated activities. Collective impact also requires that the local initiative have a solid economic base.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of the Collective Impact model on the local initiative
  2. Describe how local initiative leaders can use training to build a shared vision and understanding of strategies guiding the initiative
  3. Describe why there might be push back from governmental and nongovernmental organizations, community groups and individuals to using Collective Impact?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 31: Sharing the Vision to Achieve Collective Impact ”

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Concept 22: Adaptive Leadership

One invaluable concept and field of study to understand when working with the 100% Community initiative is called Adaptive Leadership, a way of solving challenges described in the book The Practice of Adaptive Leadership: Tools and Tactics for Changing Your Organization and the World by Heifetz, Grashow and Linsky. The book describes how there are two types of challenges as work to improve organizations and communities called technical challenges and adaptive challenges. This is a way of thinking about identifying and solving complex and political challenges that will be part of the work of the 100% New Mexico initiative.

Technical challenges, described briefly, have an agreed upon path to follow for problem-solving. Adaptive challenges have no agreed upon path forward and you’re in uncharted waters. The authors warn, with good reason, that change agents don’t want to confuse a technical challenge with an adaptive one.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the practice of Adaptive Leadership
  2. Describe a technical challenge, an adaptive challenge and the difference between them
  3. Describe a potential technical challenge you may face in your sector as you develop a project
  4. Describe a potential adaptive challenge you may face in your sector as you develop a project
  5. Describe what "getting on the balcony" means as it relates to problem-solving
  6. Describe the benefits of using adaptive leadership and consequences of not using it

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 30: Loss and Change: Understanding the Difference Between Technical and Adaptive Challenges”

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REFLECTION QUESTION: Which of these concepts do you have questions about: continuous quality improvement, collective impact, or adaptive leadership?

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PART THREE: Tools in our Toolbox

You have many tools in your toolbox, a collection of insights, experience, and understanding of concepts which guide the work of capacity-building. Think of the 100% New Mexico initiative as a problem-solving machine focused on all the communities within your county’s border, with many moving parts working in sync to empower all initiative participants and residents.

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Concept 23: Readiness for Change

Each county engaged with the 100% New Mexico initiative will be doing a Readiness and Capacity Assessment, assessing to what degree local leaders and stakeholders are committed to improving the ten services for surviving and thriving. This is a process of informational interviews to better understand how aware local leaders are of the challenges facing local families and how committed they are to preventing adverse childhood experiences and social adversity.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe signs that your county is ready for change
  2. Describe signs that your county is not ready for change
  3. How do you create work-arounds if local leaders are blocking initiative projects and innovation because of apathy, envy, fear or a variety of reasons?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 9: Courageous Champions vs Keepers of the Status Quo”

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Concept 24: Working in Alignment

All our work with the 100% New Mexico initiative is designed to be working in alignment with existing local efforts. These may be groups working within county government, city government, task forces, coalitions or nongovernmental organizations. Action teams working in a particular sector (like food security) should identify all the leaders working on problem-solving in their sector within the county’s borders. This will also include state agencies whose work impacts a county’s services. We seek to be in alignment with other data-driven, result focused entities.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. What does it mean for county, city and state service providers to be working in alignment?
  2. Describe the benefits of working in alignment with an agency and across a county
  3. How can software and technology increase alignment among county service providers and promote transparency in the process?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 37: When Epidemics Collide it’s Time for People to Collaborate”

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Concept 25: The 100% Community Survey

The 100% New Mexico survey will measure to what degree your county’s residents have access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving because you will be asking them during the survey process, “Do you need any of the ten vital services, to what degree can you access services and if you face challenges, what are they?” With this data, the local 100% New Mexico action teams can analyze the challenges in order to begin making plans to address them.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of using the 100% New Mexico survey
  2. Describe how action teams can use survey results, including why residents can’t access services, to guide projects to fix gaps in services
  3. Describe what other information, in addition to the 100% New Mexico survey results, the initiative action teams might require to get a clearer picture of all the challenges facing residents in all the communities within a county’s borders

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 6” and “Appendix A”

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Concept 26: Logic Model

One key planning tool our ten action teams use to design projects to reduce service barriers is called a logic model. It is widely used in public health and is a one-page visual representation of a plan to guide a project that includes the project’s goal, purpose, inputs, activities, outputs and outcomes. The logic model is developed with all members of a project team to have a shared understanding of how a project will be implemented and what the hoped for results are to local residents.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of using a project planning tool like a logic model
  2. Why, in designing a logic model, does a team match the activities up with the outcomes?
  3. When choosing activities and outcomes, how do you match them with the needs identified in the 100% New Mexico survey, where challenges to access services were identified?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 38” and “Appendix J”

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Concept 27: Evidence-informed Strategies

As we seek to improve the quality of family and community services and their accessibility, we will research evidence-informed strategies. We will find that many of our local challenges have already been tested and evaluated in other localities, meaning we don’t need to reinvent wheels. The Anna, Age Eight Institute launched EYE ON SOLUTIONS, a website with many evidence-informed strategies focused on increasing access to services. There are ten “centers” on the site, each one is a repository for potential projects in the ten service areas.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe what benefits there are to using evidence-informed strategies, as opposed to following a hunch or doing what’s been done forever (without measuring results).
  2. How does one find research to identify evidence-informed policies, programs or practice?
  3. What might the challenges be in matching a particular evidence-informed strategy to the service barrier identified by residents?

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Part 4, Chapters 40-50”

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Concept 28: Technology

Technology has a large role in the 100% New Mexico initiative and projects designed to increase access to the ten vital services for surviving and thriving, as well as improving how governmental and nongovernmental organizations are run. Technology will be a part of each of the 100% New Mexico innovations and projects. One important task for each county initiative will be to end the digital divide and ensure internet access for 100% of residents.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of ending the digital divide
  2. Describe how services have evolved, many with internet-based components (like online therapy)
  3. Describe how technology could improve delivery of services in your service sector

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 36: Connecting, Improving, Surfing and Muting: Adventures in Tech”

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REFLECTION QUESTION: What questions might you have about the following concepts: readiness for change, working in alignment, the countywide survey that identifies barriers to vital services, a logic model for planning projects, evidence-informed strategies, and technology?

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PART FOUR: Partnerships and you

The success of any large scale initiative or social change movement comes down to people working together to achieve shared goals. Healthy relationships are at the core of the work, and these include those working within the 100% New Mexico initiative and with our partners in the public and private sectors.

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Concept 29: Partnerships

To get anything of significance accomplished, we must build relationships and partnerships with the leaders and stakeholders on the state, county, city levels, including schools, higher education, nongovernmental organizations, and foundations. Respectful working relationships are what guide and support each local initiative, including all ten action teams.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the elected officials and other stakeholders you may need buy in from to support your projects
  2. Describe how you create an "elevator pitch" to start a dialogue about funding and support from potential partners
  3. Describe how you have seen elected officials buy in to projects that focus on health, safety, education and workforce development

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Part 4, Chapters 11-28”

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Concept 30: Public and Private Sector Partnerships

The 100% New Mexico initiative will be developing and launching innovations and projects, many of them requiring public-private sector partnerships. Business professionals and entrepreneurs often think very differently about projects and the value of getting to measurable results. In the private sector, if results are not achieved, businesses cease to exist. This is not always true for the public sector. Most public sector projects require the engagement of people from the private sector.

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe a project that benefits from the business community
  2. Describe how the public sector and private sector can collaborate to support projects
  3. Describe ways to have candid conversations about collaborating to end service barriers to support job readiness and a more productive workforce.

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Part 4, Chapter 27: The Chamber of Commerce and the Private Sector Must Be Full Partners in Ensuring Surviving and Thriving Services”

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Concept 31: Framework for Change

The 100% New Mexico initiative is a countywide process, working like a machine with many moving parts. The initiative is guided by a radically simple idea and hypothesis: if county leaders and stakeholders ensure that the ten vital services for surviving and thriving are accessible to 100% of county residents, the health, safety, education and job readiness increase while long-standing challenges such as health disparities, substance misuses, childhood trauma, hunger, home insecurity and lack of a livelihood decrease.

The initiative is a first-of-its-kind countywide program with a framework to guide it. The components of the framework are:

  1. Challenge
  2. Team
  3. Key Elements
  4. Process
  5. Engagement
  6. Results
  7. Outcomes

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe the benefits of having a framework for change
  2. Describe why an initiative focused on ensuring ten vital services across a county has never been done before
  3. Describe how to recruit local stakeholders to join the initiative

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Appendices A-L”

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Concept 32: Self-care

We don’t underestimate the importance of self-care while a local champion works on the 100% Community initiative or any community work. The initiative is long-term work, with successes celebrated all along the way. The initiative and work within all ten action teams will require that all participants prioritize their health as they develop local projects and interact with a spectrum of support, gratitude and trepidation (resistance to change that is all part of the process of change).

Discussion areas for action teams

  1. Describe self-care and why it matters
  2. Describe how to pace oneself, related to involvement in the initiative and developing project
  3. Describe opportunities for self-care in your county

Getting Answers and Insights

100% Community: “Chapter 39: Faith”

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REFLECTION QUESTION: There are many models, frameworks and theories guiding the initiative. How can the Anna, Age Eight Institute support your local team in learning about them to guide the work?

The 100% Power Hour 7-part webinar series is a good place to learn more about the key concepts that guide 100% New Mexico.

  1. Engaging in change
  2. Partnership for change
  3. Programming for change
  4. Assessing the need for change
  5. Planning for change
  6. Acting as a change agent
  7. Evaluating change

We also provides links to research articles that focus on our key topic areas:

  • ACEs and Research
  • Adversity and Research
  • 10 Sectors and Research
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NEXT STEPS: Reflect on the presentation and your notes. Review the books and links to research provided. Reach out to colleagues, friends, family, neighbors and local elected leaders to discuss the 100% New Mexico initiative. We have designed this presentation so that it can be used with local elected officials within city and county government and school board members, agency leaders (representing the ten vital services), representatives from local higher education, faith-based and community-based organizations and your neighbors and friends.

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Consider registering for the next 100% Power Hour 7-part webinar series to learn more about the 100% New Mexico initiative. We hope to see you there. For any questions about the webinar series, the initiative, research guiding the process or practical steps in starting the initiative, please contact us annaageeight@nmsu.edu.

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