Ten Sectors and Research

Challenges and opportunities for innovation: Areas of research to explore

Our Challenge and Opportunity

While the United States may boast about innovations, technological advancements and service delivery in all the services that provide a life of health, safety and empowerment, these services are not universally available to all residents. Barriers to the services that support and enrich individuals and families exist in both urban and rural communities across all 50 states. Our goal, with the 100% New Mexico initiative, is to ensure that the ten vital services for surviving and thriving are accessible, providing positive user experiences for residents of all ages.

As a result of the pandemic and lockdowns, we have seen a proliferation in web-based services and home delivery in most service areas. When faced with a crisis, our private sector knows how to innovate, often with startling speed and imaginative results. We can harness this creative think-outside-the-box mindset in the public sector on the local level.

We believe we are positioned in each county, working in alignment with local government, to convene leaders of all ten service areas and design seamless systems of online and on site public sector services including medical care, behavioral health care, food security programs, housing security programs, transportation, parent supports, early childhood learning, fully-resourced community schools with health centers, youth mentor programs and job training.

We provide you with a starting point, exploring the research that informs development of the ten services that are the focus of the 100% New Mexico initiative.

In addition to exploring research on our service sectors, we invite y0u to explore our research pages on addressing social adversity and adverse childhood experiences.

References and Reading

The research articles offered here, primarily from peer-reviewed journals, are focused on our ten services for surviving and thriving, including innovations in delivery. They can provide ongoing professional development, research, analysis of best practice, and promotion of community dialogue and attention focused on educating all providers and residents about the opportunity to create a countywide system of family-friendly service that strengthen households, schools, campuses, the workforce and local economies. Familiarity with research on our ten interrelated service areas is the most effective way for organizations, including public and private sector partnerships, to build the capacity of city and county governments to ensure equity for 100% of residents.

Medical and Dental Care

The 100% New Mexico initiative provides local stakeholders the strategies to ensure, county by county, that systems of medical and dental care are working effectively to serve all residents. We live in a time of vast knowledge regarding innovations in health promotion, patient care, delivery and design, development, and treatment where the only reasons for a family going without easy access to care in your locality are all man made. The research and human ingenuity you discover here, coupled with innovative public and private sector partnerships, can ensure that 100% survive and thrive.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: School-based health centers and cost-benefit analysis of care and disparities1, Hispanic health and disparities2,3,4, rural health5,6 medical care disparities, border health7,8,9, hospice care10, school-based dental health11,12,13 and mobile dental care14, dental health disparities 15.

REFERENCES

  1. School-Based Health Centers: Cost–Benefit Analysis and Impact on Health Care Disparities. Jeff J. Guo, PhD, Terrance J. Wade, PhD, Wei Pan, PhD, and Kathryn N. Keller, MPA. 2010. https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.2009.18518
  2. Hispanic health in the USA: a scoping review of the literature. Eduardo Velasco-Mondragon, Angela Jimenez, Anna G. Palladino-Davis, Dawn Davis and Jose A. Escamilla-Cejudo. 2016. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s40985-016-0043-2
  3. Hispanic Healthcare Disparities: Challenging the Myth of a Monolithic Hispanic Population. Robin M. Weinick, Elizabeth A. Jacobs, Lisa Cacari Stone, Alexander N. Ortega and Helen Burstin. Medical Care. 2004. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4640744?seq=1
  4. Factors Influencing the Access to Prenatal Care by Hispanic Pregnant Women. Cynthia F. Shaffer, RN, MSN, NP‐C. 2005. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1745-7599.2002.tb00097.x
  5. Rural Health Disparities, Population Health, and Rural Culture. David Hartley, PhD, MHA. 2004. https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/full/10.2105/AJPH.94.10.1675
  6. Overcoming the triad of rural health disparities: How local culture, lack of economic opportunity, and geographic location instigate health disparities. Tami L Thomas, Ralph DiClemente and Samuel Snell. 2013. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0017896912471049
  7. Challenges and Opportunities in Border Health. Joel Rodríguez-Saldaña, MD. 2004. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1323306/
  8. Place, positionality, and priorities: Experts’ views on women's health at the Mexico–US border. Janice Monka, Patricia Manning, Catalina Denmanc and Elsa Cornejod. 2009. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1353829209000070
  9. Access to specialty healthcare in urban versus rural US populations: a systematic literature review. Melissa E. Cyr, Anna G. Etchin, Barbara J. Guthrie and James C. Benneyan. 2019. https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-019-4815-5
  10. Bereaved Family Members' Evaluation of Hospice Care: What Factors Influence Overall Satisfaction with Services. Ramona L. Rhodes, MD, MPH, Susan L. Mitchell, MD, MPH, Susan C. Miller, PhD, Stephen R.Connor, PhD, Joan M.Teno, MD, MS. 2008. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0885392408000079
  11. Assessing the Effectiveness of a School-Based Dental Clinic on the Oral Health of Children Who Lack Access to Dental Care: A Program Evaluation. Rachel Carpino, BA, Mary P. Walker, DDS, PhD, Ying Liu, PhD and Melanie Simmer-Beck, RDH, PhD. 2016. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1059840516671784
  12. School screening and parental reminders in increasing dental care for children in need: a retrospective cohort study. Suchitra Nelson PhD, Jason Mandelaris, DMD Gerald Ferretti, DDS, MS, MPH, Masahiro Heima DDS, PhD, Charles Spiekerman PhD and Peter Milgrom, DDS. 2011. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1752-7325.2011.00282.x
  13. Evaluation of School-Based Dental Sealant Programs: An Updated Community Guide Systematic Economic Review. Susan O.Griffin, PhD, Shillpa Naavaal, MS, Christina Scherrer PhD, Mona Patel, MPH, Sajal Chattopadhyay, PhD, and the Community Preventive Services Task Force. 2017. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0749379716305104
  14. Analysis of Annual Costs of Mobile Clinics in the Southern United States. Sharon Attipoe-Dorcoo, Rigoberto Delgado, Dejian Lai, Aditi Gupta and Stephen Linder. 2020.
  15. Disparities in Children's Oral Health and Access to Dental Care. Wendy E. Mouradian, MD, MS, Elizabeth Wehr, JD and James J. Crall, DDS, ScD. 2000. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/193312

Behavioral Healthcare

In a world of colliding crises, change and uncertainty, we require a robust behavioral health care system in every community. The key word is system, because scattered and disconnected public and private agencies or individual practices (many unaffordable) simply won’t get the job done. Whether we use the term behavioral health care, mental health care or systems promoting emotional well-being, the focus is to create a network of healing.

Every county has residents experiencing behavioral health care disparities and some have segments of the population reporting extreme difficulty accessing care. In times of crisis like a pandemic or severe economic downturn, access to behavioral care becomes even more critical. The human ingenuity you discover here can ensure that 100% can access the critical care they need.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: service utilization by children and adolescents in schools1, Technology-based Behavioral Health2, web-based training methods3, telemedicine interventions4, mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools5, associations between internet use and poor mental health6, mental health mobile applications7, digital mental health interventions8, feasibility of eHealth in mental health care9, differences between school-based Health centers with and without mental health providers10, school-based depression and anxiety prevention11, substance abuse treatment provider views of “culture” and rural settings12, address rural mental health disparities13, and integrating social justice advocacy into mental health counseling14.

REFERENCES

  1. Rates of Mental Health Service Utilization by Children and Adolescents in Schools and Other Common Service Settings: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Mylien T. Duong, Eric J. Bruns, Kristine Lee, Shanon Cox, Jessica Coifman, Ashley Mayworm & Aaron R. Lyon. 2020. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10488-020-01080-9
  2. Integration of Technology-based Behavioral Health Interventions in Substance Abuse and Addiction Services. Alex Ramsey, Ph.D.2015. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4492163/
  3. Web-Based Training Methods for Behavioral Health Providers: A Systematic Review. Carrie B. Jackson, M.S., Lauren B. Quetsch, M.S., Laurel A. Brabson, M.S., and Amy D. Herschell, Ph.D. 2019. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6002894/
  4. The Empirical Evidence for Telemedicine Interventions in Mental Disorders. Rashid L. Bashshur, PhD, Gary W. Shannon, PhD, Noura Bashshur, MHSA, and Peter M. Yellowlees, MD. 2016. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4744872/
  5. Exploring mental health providers' interest in using web and mobile-based tools in their practices. Stephen M. Schuellera, Jason J. Washburn and Matthew Price. 2016. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2214782916300197
  6. Prospective associations between internet use and poor mental health: A population-based study. Becky Mars, David Gunnell, Lucy Biddle, Judi Kidger, Paul Moran, Lizzy Winstone and Jon Heron. 2020. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0235889
  7. Evidence-Based Apps? A Review of Mental Health Mobile Applications in a Psychotherapy Context. Joyce H. L. Lui, David K. Marcus, and Christopher T. Barry. 2017. https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/1012/2018/10/Evidence-based-apps-A-review-of-mental-health-mobile-applications-in-a-psychotherapy-context.pdf
  8. What Works and What Doesn’t Work? A Systematic Review of Digital Mental Health Interventions for Depression and Anxiety in Young People. Sandra Garrido, Chris Millington, Daniel Cheers, Katherine Boydell, Emery Schubert, Tanya Meade and Quang Vinh Nguyen. 2019. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00759/full
  9. The Feasibility of eHealth in Mental Health Care. Syaron Basnet, Manu Tamminen and Tuuli Lahti. 2014. https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/the-feasibility-of-ehealth-in-mental-health-care-2155-6105-5-205.php?aid=35686
  10. Characteristic Differences Between School-Based Health Centers With and Without Mental Health Providers: A Review of National Trends. Satu Larson PhD, RN, CPNP, Joanne Spetz, PhD, Claire D.Brindis, DrPH, Susan Chapman PhD, RN, FAAN. 2017. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0891524517300044
  11. School-based depression and anxiety prevention programs for young people: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Aliza Werner-Seidler, PhD, Yael Perry, PhD, Alison L. Calear, PhD, Jill M. Newby, PhD, Helen Christensen, PhD. 2017. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0272735815301409
  12. Substance Abuse Treatment Provider Views of “Culture”: Implications for Behavioral Health Care in Rural Settings. Gilbert A. Quintero University of Montana Elizabeth Lilliott Cathleen Willging Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation. 2007 https://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.982.4326&rep=rep1&type=pdf
  13. A call to action to address rural mental health disparities. Dawn A. Morales, Crystal L. Barksdale, and Andrea C. Beckel-Mitchener 2020 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7681156/
  14. Integrating Social Justice Advocacy into Mental Health Counseling in Rural, Impoverished American Communities. Loni Crumb, Natoya Haskins and Shanita Brown. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=social+determinants+of+health&pr=on&ft=on&pg=3&id=EJ1215753

Food Security Programs

Our initiative is supporting an end to hunger and food insecurity on a countywide scale, ensuring all resident’s food needs are met. Hunger has been with us for as long as we have been strolling the planet. In the last few hundred years societies of all sizes have found ways to hunt animals, grow food and secure drinking water to survive. While nature can be a cause for lack of food, in modern societies the cause can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure a healthy food supply. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, an entire food industry produces more than enough food to make food insecurity history.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: food security strategies and food insecure households with children1, food security through organizing strategies2, food insecurity among undergraduate students3,4, health inequities and food security5, food security and COVID-196, interventions to reduce household food insecurity7, rigorous interventions to improve child food security8, food insecurity in advanced capitalist nations9, adverse childhood experiences and food insecurity10, confronting hunger amidst a crisis11, de-mystifying family farming12 and structuring markets for resilient farming systems13.

REFERENCES

  1. Community Food Security Strategies: An Exploratory Study of Their Potential for Food Insecure Households with Children. Michelle L. Kaiser, Kareem Usher and Colleen Spees. 2015 https://eric.ed.gov/?q=food+security+in+rural++&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1188417
  2. Advancing Childhood Food Security through Organizing Strategies. Jon Singletary, Jeremy K. Everett and Erin Nolen. 2012. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=food+security+in+rural++&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1189075
  3. Experiences of Food Insecurity among Undergraduate Students: "You Can't Starve Yourself through School". Marryn Maynard, Samatha B. Meyer, Christopher M. Perlman, Sharon I. Kirkpatrick. 2018. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=food+security+in+rural++&pr=on&ft=on&pg=2&id=EJ1189978
  4. A systematic review of food insecurity among US students in higher education. Aydin Nazmi, Suzanna Martinez, Ajani Byrd, Derrick Robinson, Stephanie Bianco and Jennifer Maguire. 2018. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19320248.2018.1484316
  5. Health Inequities and the Shifting Paradigms of Food Security, Food Insecurity, and Food Sovereignty. Arnel M. Borras and Faisal Ali Mohamed. 2020. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0020731420913184
  6. Food access in crisis: Food security and COVID-19. Sabine O'Hara and Etienne C.Toussaint. 2021. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0921800920312179
  7. Interventions to reduce household food insecurity: a synthesis of current concepts and approaches for Latin America. Donald Diego Rose. 2008. https://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?pid=S1415-52732008000700014&script=sci_arttext
  8. The Need for Investment in Rigorous Interventions to Improve Child Food Security. Heather A. Eicher-Miller, PhD. 2020. https://jandonline.org/article/S2212-2672(20)30546-3/abstract
  9. Food Insecurity in Advanced Capitalist Nations: A Review. Michael A. Long, Lara Gonçalves, Paul B. Stretesky, and Margaret Anne Defeyter. 2020. https://www.mdpi.com/2071-1050/12/9/3654
  10. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Food Insecurity in Adulthood: Evidence From the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health. AlexanderTesta, Ph.D. and Dylan B.Jackson, Ph.D. 2020. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1054139X20300586
  11. Pandemic Reveals Vulnerabilities in Food Access: Confronting Hunger Amidst a Crisis. Melissa G. Bublitz, Natalie Czarkowski, Jonathan Hansen, Laura A. Peracchio, and Sherrie Tussler. 2020. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0743915620929998
  12. De-mystifying family farming: Features, diversity and trends across the globe. Jiska A. van Vliet, Antonius G.T. Schut, Pytrik Reidsma, Katrien Descheemaeker, Maja Slingerl, Gerrie W. J. van de Ven and Ken E.Giller. 2015. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2211912415000115
  13. Structuring Markets for Resilient Farming Systems. Vivian Valencia, Hannah Wittman and Jennifer Blesh. 2019. https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s13593-019-0572-4.pdf

Housing Security Programs

We are supporting data-driven strategies, insights and technical assistance to end housing security disparities on a countywide scale, ensuring all resident’s housing needs are met. Housing disparities, lack of timely access to stable, safe and affordable housing, has been with us for as long as we have been building villages and housing humans on the planet. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide accessible housing for all residents.

In modern societies the cause of housing insecurity can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure the right supply of affordable housing. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to make housing insecurity history.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: proactive strategies to alleviate homelessness1, technologies to facilitate healthy city planning2, housing affordability3, different stages of housing reintegration4, land use public processes5, social housing associations6, the “15-Minute City” in future post-pandemic cities7, a meta-analysis of housing models for persons with mental iIllness8, housing affordability research and policy9, tackling homelessness with tiny houses10, and providing housing and transportation for low income, elderly and disabled people11.

REFERENCES

  1. Making the Case for Proactive Strategies to Alleviate Homelessness: A Systems Approach. Sara Nourazari, Kristina Lovato and Suzie S. Weng. 2021. https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/2/526
  2. Social inequalities in neighborhood visual walkability: Using street view imagery and deep learning technologies to facilitate healthy city planning. Hao Zhou, Shenjing He, Yuyang Cai, Miao Wange and Shiliang Suab 2019. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2210670718327483
  3. The pace of “the good life”: Connecting past, present, and future in the context of a housing affordability crisis. Petr Kubala, Tomáš Hoření Samec. 2021. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0961463X20987814
  4. Met and unmet needs of homeless individuals at different stages of housing reintegration: A mixed-method investigation. Marie-Josée Fleury, Guy Grenier, Judith Sabetti,Karine Bertrand, Michèle Clément, Serge Brochu. 2021. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0245088
  5. Overparticipation: Designing Effective Land Use Public Processes. Anika Singh Lemar. 2021. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3786306
  6. Circular strategies for social housing associations: Lessons from a Dutch case. Manon Eikelenboom, Thomas B. Long and Gjaltde Jong. 2021. https:/2444/www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095965262100
  7. Introducing the “15-Minute City”: Sustainability, Resilience and Place Identity in Future Post-Pandemic Cities. Carlos Moreno, Zaheer Allam, Didier Chabaud, Catherine Gall and Florent Pratlong. 2021. https://www.mdpi.com/2624-6511/4/1/6
  8. Housing affordability: a framing, synthesis of research and policy, and future directions. George Galster and Kwan Ok Lee 2019. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/12265934.2020.1713864
  9. Does One Size Fit All? What We Can and Can't Learn From a Meta-analysis of Housing Models for Persons With Mental Illness. H. Stephen Leff Ph.D., Clifton M. Chow, M.A., Renee Pepin, M.A., Jeremy Conley, B.Ph.I., Elaine Allen, Ph.D., Christopher A. Seaman, B.S. 2015. https://ps.psychiatryonline.org/doi/full/10.1176/ps.2009.60.4.473
  10. Tackling Homelessness with Tiny Houses: An Inventory of Tiny House Villages in the United States. Krista Evans. 2020. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/00330124.2020.1744170
  11. Creating the Accessible City: Proposals for Providing Housing and Transportation for Low Income, Elderly and Disabled People. John I. Gilderbloom, Mark S. Rosentraub. 1990. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1536-7150.1990.tb02279.x

Public Transportation

Our initiative’s goal is to end transportation disparities on a countywide scale, ensuring all resident’s transport needs are met. Transportation disparities means lack of timely access to secure, safe and affordable public transport. Challenges in public transportation have existed for a long time in the USA, especially rural America. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide accessible public transportation to all residents.

In modern societies the cause of transportation disparities can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure the right amount of affordable transportation. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to make transportation insecurity history.

One quick online search will overwhelm you with solutions to the transport disparities problem. The enormous number of results shows that there are many people searching for answers, interested in understanding the root causes of transportation disparities and how to solve it.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: use of science to guide city planning policy1, a typology of transit governance2, urban inequalities3, Incorporating Uber and Lyft in subsidized ride programs that serve vulnerable populations4, Environmental correlates of walking and cycling5, integrating civil rights laws in partnerships between transit agencies and ride-hailing companies6, Innovative health care mobility services7, replacing a fixed public transport line by a demand responsive transport system8, transportation incentive program for affordable housing residents9, the rise of mobility as a service10, and alternative transportation programs in reducing impaired driving11.

REFERENCES

  1. Use of science to guide city planning policy and practice: how to achieve healthy and sustainable future cities. Prof. James F Sallis, PhD, Prof. Fiona Bull, PhD, Prof. Ricky Burdett, MS, Prof. Lawrence D Frank, PhD, Peter Griffiths, MS, Prof. Billie Giles-Corti, PhD and Prof. Mark Stevenson, PhD. 2016. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S014067361630068X
  2. Who Decides? Toward a Typology of Transit Governance. Lauren Ames Fischer, Rosalie Singerman Ray and David A. King. 2020. https://www.mdpi.com/2413-8851/5/1/6
  3. City government and urban inequalities. Fran Tonkiss. 2020. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13604813.2020.1739931
  4. The Benefits and Challenges of Incorporating Uber and Lyft in Subsidized Ride Programs that Serve Vulnerable Populations. Jeremy Halpern, Elizabeth Deakin and Madeline Parker. 2020. https://escholarship.org/uc/item/4gk412w6
  5. Environmental correlates of walking and cycling: Findings from the transportation, urban design, and planning literatures. Brian E. Saelens, Ph.D., James F. Sallis, Ph.D., Lawrence D. Frank, Ph.D. 2003. https://academic.oup.com/abm/article/25/2/80/4631527?login=true
  6. Mobility as a public service : integrating civil rights laws in partnerships between transit agencies and ride-hailing companies. Peter Damrosch and Peter Leopold. 2020. http://34.201.211.163/handle/1721.1/129872
  7. Innovative health care mobility services in the US. Mary K. Wolfe & Noreen C. McDonald. 2020. https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-020-08803-5
  8. Impacts of replacing a fixed public transport line by a demand responsive transport system: Case study of a rural area in Amsterdam. Felipe Mariz Coutinho, Nielsvan Oorta, Zoi Christoforoub, María J. Alonso-Gonzáleza, Oded Catsa, and Serge Hoogendoorna. 2020. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0739885920301086
  9. Evaluation of a Transportation Incentive Program for Affordable Housing Residents. Huijun Tan, Nathan McNeil, John MacArthur and Kelly Rogers. 2021. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0361198121997431
  10. The coming disruption – The rise of mobility as a service and the implications for government. Anna Wilson and Ben Mason. 2020. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0739885920300962
  11. The effectiveness of alternative transportation programs in reducing impaired driving: A literature review and synthesis. James C. Fella, Jennifer Scolesea, Tom Achokib, Courtney Burksc, Allison Goldberg and William DeJongd. 2020 https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022437520301043

Youth Mentor Programs

The initiative is here to provide county and city stakeholders with research, data-driven strategies, insights and support to end the lack of mentor programs on a countywide scale, ensuring all children and youth have access to mentorship programs. Lack of youth mentorship, in a structured and tested model, has been with us for as long as we adults have been raising children on the planet. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide accessible youth mentors to young people.

In modern societies the cause of our woeful lack of mentorship programs can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure the right amount of mentors and staff to make matches between mentors and mentees. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to create robust mentorship programs.

One quick online search will overwhelm you with solutions to what we might call the lack of mentorship problem. The enormous number of results shows that there are many people searching for answers, interested in understanding the root causes of communities without youth mentors and how to solve it.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: mentoring and children’s mental health1, best practices in school-based mentoring2, mentoring relationships influence on adolescents' academic adjustment3, mentoring and at-risk students4, mentoring for youth receiving outpatient mental health services5, mentoring and measuring multiple intervention processes6, non-specific versus targeted approaches7, value-for-money8, qualitative investigation of community-based mentoring9, and an impact study of Big Brothers Big Sisters10.

REFERENCES

  1. Back to the Future: Mentoring as Means and End in Promoting Child Mental Health. Timothy A. Cavell, Renée Spencer and Samuel D. McQuillin. 2021. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15374416.2021.1875327
  2. Best Practices in School-Based Mentoring Programs for Adolescents. Komosa-Hawkins. 2010. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0145935X.2009.524477
  3. Agents of Change: Pathways through Which Mentoring Relationships Influence Adolescents' Academic Adjustment. Jean E. Rhodes, Jean B. Grossman and Nancy L. Resch. 2003. https://srcd.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/1467-8624.00256
  4. Making a difference with at-risk students: The benefits of a mentoring program in middle school. Suzanne F. Lindt and Cody Blair. 2016. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00940771.2017.1243919
  5. Investigation of the reach and effectiveness of a mentoring program for youth receiving outpatient mental health services. David L. DuBois, Carla Herrera and Elizabeth Higley. 2018. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0190740918301336
  6. Improving understanding of how mentoring works: Measuring multiple intervention processes. Patrick H. Tolan, Heather L. McDaniel, Malachi Richardson, Nora Arkin, Julia Augenstern, and David L. DuBois. 2020. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/jcop.22408
  7. Non-Specific versus Targeted Approaches to Youth Mentoring: A Follow-up Meta-analysis. Kirsten M. Christensen, Matthew A. Hagler, Geert-Jan Stams, Elizabeth B. Raposa, Samantha Burton and Jean E. Rhodes. 2020. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10964-020-01233-x
  8. Are youth mentoring programs good value-for-money? An evaluation of the Big Brothers Big Sisters Melbourne Program. Marjory L Moodie & Jane Fisher. 2009. https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-9-41
  9. Mentors’ approach to relationship-building and the supports they provide to youth: A qualitative investigation of community-based mentoring relationships. Alison L.Drew and Renée Spencer. 2021. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0190740920322684
  10. Making a Difference: An Impact Study of Big Brothers Big Sisters. Joseph P. Tierney and Jean Baldwin Grossman. 1995, reissue 2000. http://ppv.issuelab.org/resources/11972/11972.pdf

Community Schools

We are working with our partners in public education to provide county and city stakeholders with research, data-driven strategies, insights and support to end education and health disparities on a countywide scale, ensuring all students can access quality fully-resourced community schools. Disparities may be the lack of access to the array of services and supports in a community school. Lack of school-based services to strengthen the learning environment has been with us for a long time, especially in rural and low-income communities. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide fully-resourced schools to all students needing such institutions.

In modern societies the cause of education and health disparities can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure the right amount of staffing, programs, supports and health care providers for each public school. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to make every school into a fully-resourced community school with a school-based health center offering medical, dental and mental health care.

One quick online search will overwhelm you with solutions to the education and health disparities problem. The enormous number of results shows that there are many people searching for answers, interested in understanding the root causes of disparities and how to solve it by funding the community school model.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: community schools the new mexico way1, racial equity2, collaborative relationships3, leveraging resources4, challenges faced by rural principals5, a systems perspective on community school coordinators6, effective school improvement strategy7, and community school implementation strategies8,9,10,11.

REFERENCES

  1. Community Schools the New Mexico Way. Jeannie Oakes and David Espinoza. 2021. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED610897
  2. A Step Closer to Racial Equity: Towards a Culturally Sustaining Model for Community Schools. Julia Daniel, Hui-Ling Sunshine Malone and David E. Kirkland. 2020. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0042085920954906
  3. Strong Collaborative Relationships for Strong Community Schools. Julia Daniel. 2017. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED578684
  4. Leveraging Resources through Community Schools: The Role of Technical Assistance. Policy Brief. Anna Maier, Sarah Klevan and Naomi Ondrasek. 2020. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED606822
  5. Common Challenges Faced by Rural Principals: A Review of the Literature. Jane P. Preston, Brittany Jakubiec and Robin Kooymans. 2013 https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+in+rural++&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1022612
  6. Spanning Boundaries and Balancing Tensions: A Systems Perspective on Community School Coordinators. Linda K. Mayger and Craig D. Hochbein. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1236593
  7. Community Schools as an Effective School Improvement Strategy: A Review of the Evidence. Anna Maier, Julia Daniel, Jeannie Oakes, and Livia Lam. 2017. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED606765
  8. "We're One Team": Examining Community School Implementation Strategies in Oakland. Kendra Fehrer and Jacob Leos-Urbel. 2016. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=community+schools+&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1116797
  9. Community Schools: People and Places Transforming Education and Communities. (Editors) JoAnne Ferrara, Ed.D. and Reuben Jacobson, Ph.D. 2018. https://books.google.com/books/about/Community_Schools.html?id=nSWTDwAAQBAJ 
  10. Community Schools: A Promising Foundation for Progress, American Educator. Anna Maier, Julia Daniel, Jeannie Oakes and Livia Lam. 2018. https://www.aft.org/sites/default/files/ae_summer2018_maier.pdf
  11. Twenty Years, Ten Lessons: Twenty Years, Ten Lessons: Community Schools as An Equitable School Improvement Strategy. Jane Quinn and Martin J. Blank. 2021. https://steinhardt.nyu.edu/metrocenter/vue/twenty-years-ten-lessons

Parent Supports

We live in a time of vast knowledge regarding innovations in face-to-face and online parent supports, where the only reason for a family going without easy access to affordable parent supports in your locality is man-made. The human ingenuity you discover here can ensure that our children and families thrive.

We are providing the data-driven strategies, insights and support to end parent support disparities on a countywide scale, ensuring all resident’s parent support needs are met. Parent support disparities, lack of timely access to the array of affordable parent support programs, has been with us for a long time. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide accessible parent supports to all residents needing it.

In modern societies the cause of parent support disparities can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure the right amount of affordable parent support programs and providers. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to make the lack of parent supports history.

One quick online search will overwhelm you with solutions to the parent support disparities problem. The enormous number of results shows that there are many people searching for answers, interested in understanding the root causes of disparities and how to solve it.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: home visiting for first-time parents1, universal reach at birth2, home-visiting programs and preventing child abuse3, critical issues and future directions4, evidence-based home visitation programs5, strengthening home visiting6, cultural competence and responsiveness7, parent support legislation8, program feasible for rural settings9, community needs assessment10, web-based parenting support11, effects of COVID-1912,13, and parent advocacy14.

HOME VISITATION PROGRAMS REFERENCES

  1. Home Visiting for First-Time Parents: Community Innovation. Rebecca M. Kilburn and Jill S. Cannon. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?pr=on&ft=on&q=universal+home+visiting+programs&id=EJ1220078
  2. Universal Reach at Birth: Family Connects. Kenneth A. Dodge and Benjamin W. Goodman. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?pr=on&ft=on&q=universal+home+visiting+programs&id=EJ1220080
  3. The Role of Home-Visiting Programs in Preventing Child Abuse and Neglect. Kimberly S. Howard and Jeanne Brooks-Gunn. 2009. https://eric.ed.gov/?pr=on&ft=on&q=universal+home+visiting+programs&id=EJ856318
  4. Home visitation programs: Critical Issues and Future Directions. Lenette Azzi-Lessing. 2011. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0885200611000238
  5. Evidence-Based Home Visitation Programs Work to Put Children First. Cheryl L. Weise. 2014 https://eric.ed.gov/?q=home+visitation+programs&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1188822
  6. Strengthening Home Visiting: Partnership and Innovation in Los Angeles County. Christina Altmayer and Barbara Andrade DuBransky. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=nurse+family+partnership+programs&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1220079
  7. Increasing the Cultural Competence & Responsiveness of Family Nurse Practitioners Preparing to Work with Children with Behavioral Challenges from High-Minority Low-Income Communities. Tyrone Robinson and Christine Clark, Christine. 2017. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=nurse+family+partnership+programs&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1170196

PARENT EDUCATION SUPPORT REFERENCES

  1. A National Survey of Parent Support Legislation and Regulations. Nancy P. Correa, Bethanie Van Horne, Christopher Greeley and Angelo P. Giardino. 2014. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=home+visitation+programs&pr=on&ft=on&ff1=subHome+Visits&ff2=dtySince_2012&ff3=subParent+Education&id=EJ1188852
  2. Parent Connectors: A Parent-to-Parent Support Program Feasible for Rural Settings. Kristin Duppong Hurley and Jacqueline Huscroft-D'Angelo. 2018. https://eric.ed.gov/?pr=on&ft=on&q=parent+support+programs&id=EJ1194655
  3. Report from the Field: The Results of a Community Needs Assessment for Parent Education in Houston, Texas. Nancy P. Correa, Christopher Greeley and Angelo P. Giardino. 2013. https://eric.ed.gov/?pr=on&ft=on&q=parent+support+programs&id=EJ1188788
  4. Web-Based Parenting Support: Development of the COPING Confident Parenting Programme. Judith Hutchings, Dawn Owen and Margiad Williams. 2018. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parent+education++web-based&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1199438
  5. Effects of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Students and Their Parents. Olga Graumann. 2020. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parent+education++and+covid+19&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1278625
  6. Home Learning in Times of COVID: Experiences of Parents. Shelina Bhamani, Areeba Zainab Makhdoom, Vardah Bharuchi, Nasreen Ali, Nasreen, Sidra Kaleem and Dawood Ahmed. 2020. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parent+education++and+covid+19&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1259928
  7. Putting Families at the Center: The Role of Parent Advocacy Groups during COVID-19. Lynn Olson and Georgia Heyward. 2020. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=parent+education++and+covid+19&pr=on&ft=on&ff1=dtySince_2020&id=ED610603

Early Childhood Learning Programs

As a society, we claim to treasure each child, yet our rates of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), trauma and maltreatment tell a very different story. Investing in a seamless countywide system of early childhood learning programs, including staff serving as navigators to all parent supports, can reduce childhood adversity and strengthen family systems.

We provide you and all your county stakeholders with the strategies to ensure, county by county, that systems of early childhood learning are working effectively to serve all residents. We live in a time of vast knowledge regarding innovations in face-to-face and online early childhood learning, where the only reason for a family going without easy access to early childhood learning programs in your locality is man-made.

Early childhood education has the capacity to empower us at a very young age. We have millions of people reading thousands upon thousands of articles and books on how the first three months of an infant’s life is pivotal. Other research focuses on the first three years that shape us. We know that each day matters as children move through the stages of newborn to infant to child to youth. We are developing and learning minute by minute, ideally guided by caring adults in the home. It should go without saying that early childhood learning programs can have a significant role in identifying, preventing and treating adverse childhood experiences and trauma.

The human ingenuity you discover here can ensure that 100% of our children have the capacity to thrive.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: the art of early childhood education1, nature-based early childhood education2, program participation3, promoting health4, economic returns5, a meta-analysis on STEM studies in early childhood education6, mathematics education in rural early childhood centers7, Accountability Incentives8, investigating the creativity of children9, the Montessori model10, designing a logic model to Inform Montessori Research11, the frontiers of orientation and mobility for infants and toddlers12, ready for "La Escuela": school readiness and languages13, developing critical thinking in early childhood through the philosophy of Reggio Emilia14, and children's cognitive play opportunities15.

REFERENCES

  1. The Art of Early Childhood Education. Eleanor D. Brown. 2020.https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1241258
  2. Planting the Seeds for Nature-Based Learning: Impacts of a Farm- and Nature-Based Early Childhood Education Program. Kylie Rymanowicz, Chelsea Hetherington, and Brooke Larm. 2020. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Planting+the+Seeds+for+Nature-Based+Learning%3a+Impacts+of+a+Farm-+and+Nature-Based+Early+Childhood+Education+Program.&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1280494
  3. Early Childhood Program Participation: 2019. First Look. Jiashan Cui and Luke Natzke. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED607039
  4. Promoting Health in Early Childhood. Maya Rossin-Slater. 2015. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&pg=2&id=EJ1062947
  5. The Economic Returns to Early Childhood Education. Lynn A. Karoly. 2016. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&pg=2&id=EJ1118537
  6. A Meta-Analysis on STEM Studies in Early Childhood Education. Secil Yücelyigit and Zerrin Toker. 2021. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&pg=3&id=EJ1285371
  7. Supporting Mathematics Education in Rural Early Childhood Centers. Allison Jane Fahsl and Jennifer Michelle Gauble Hope. 2018. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+effectiveness&pr=on&ft=on&pg=3&id=EJ1193599
  8. The Effects of Accountability Incentives in Early Childhood Education. Daphna Bassok, Thomas S. Dee and Scott Latham. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=early+childhood+learning+program+at+the+US+Mexico+border&pr=on&ft=on&id=ED600989
  9. Investigating the Creativity of Children in Early Childhood Education Institutions. Zeynep Dere. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=universal+early+childhood+learning+programs&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1207637
  10. The Montessori Model and Creativity. David J. Fleming, Brooke Culclasure and Daniel Zhang. 2019 https://eric.ed.gov/?q=montessori&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1234751
  11. Designing a Logic Model to Inform Montessori Research. Brooke Taylor Culclasure, Carolyn J. Daoust, Sally Morris Cote and Susan Zoll. 2019. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=montessori&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1216873
  12. Expanding the Frontiers of Orientation and Mobility for Infants and Toddlers in New Mexico and Utah. Hong Phangia Dewald, Cindy Faris, Karen S. Borg, Julie Maner, Loreta Martinez-Cargo and Mark Carter. 2015. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=Mexico+child+development&pr=on&ft=on&id=EJ1114533
  13. Ready for "La Escuela": School Readiness and the Languages of Instruction in Kindergarten. Zoila Tazi. 2014. https://eric.ed.gov/?q=child+development+and+bilingual&pr=on&ft=on&pg=2&id=EJ1176145
  14. Developing critical thinking in early childhood through the philosophy of Reggio Emilia. Mercè Fernández-Santín and Maria Feliu-Torruella. 2020. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1871187120301607
  15. "The Woods Is a More Free Space for Children to Be Creative; Their Imagination Kind of Sparks out There": Exploring Young Children's Cognitive Play Opportunities in Natural, Manufactured and Mixed Outdoor Preschool Zones. Zahra Zamani. 2016 https://eric.ed.gov/?q=opportunity+zones&pr=on&id=EJ1096904

Job Training Programs and Job Creation Programs

We provide county and city stakeholders with research, data-driven strategies, insights and support to end job training disparities on a countywide scale, ensuring that all residents can access job training in its many forms. Job training disparities, lack of timely access to quality training for jobs that align with the job market, has been with us for as long as we have been offering education on the planet. In the last few decades societies of all sizes have found ways to provide avenues to job training to all residents.

In modern societies the cause of job training disparities can often be tracked down to lack of investment in the human capital and resources needed to secure healthy educational institutions that align their training with the job markets. In the USA, a country with vast amounts of wealth and resources, we have all the technology and know how to make job training disparities history.

One quick online search will overwhelm you with solutions to the job training problem. The enormous number of results shows that there are many people searching for answers, interested in understanding the root causes of health disparities and how to solve it.

We also provide research articles on economic development to grow the jobs we can train people for.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: Effects of Job Skills Training on Substance Misuse1, Industry restructuring and the displaced older worker2, Changing Nature and Organization of Work3, Policies to Help Distressed Communities4, Lifelong Learning in the Era of Technological Revolution5, Pandemic's Evolving Impacts on the Labor Market6, Aligning Workforce Training Center Curricula With Local Business Needs7.

REFERENCES

  1. Spillover Effects of Job Skills Training on Substance Misuse Among Low-Income Youths With Employment Barriers: A Longitudinal Cohort Study. Sehun Oh, PhD, Diana M. DiNitto, PhD, and Daniel A. Powers, PhD. 2020. https://ajph.aphapublications.org/doi/abs/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305631
  2. Industry restructuring and job loss: towards a guiding model to assist the displaced older worker. Victor J Callan, Kaye Bowman, Terrance W Fitzsimmons and Alison L Poulsen. 2020. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/13636820.2020.1744693
  3. The Changing Nature and Organization of Work: An Integrative Review of the Literature. Ellen Scully-Russ and Richard Torraco. 2019. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/1534484319886394
  4. Using Place-Based Jobs Policies to Help Distressed Communities. Timothy J. Bartik. 2020. https://www.aeaweb.org/articles?id=10.1257%2Fjep.34.3.99
  5. Education, Skill Training, and Lifelong Learning in the Era of Technological Revolution. Cyn-Young Park and Jinyoung Kim. 2020. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3590922
  6. The COVID-19 Pandemic's Evolving Impacts on the Labor Market: Who's Been Hurt and What We Should Do. Upjohn Institute working paper. Brad Hershbein and Harry J. Holzer. 2021. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3788395
  7. Aligning Workforce Training Center Curricula With Local Business Needs. Elizabeth P. Burns. 2020. https://scholarworks.waldenu.edu/dissertations/8600/

Economic Development and Job Creation

Pre-pandemic, job opportunities were very scarce in some communities, especially rural areas. Now entire industries have been greatly reduced since lockdown, especially in the tourism and restaurant sectors. To address job scarcity it is possible for each county to invest in a process by which the number of jobs increases. Job creation often refers to government policies intended to reduce unemployment. Job creation programs may take a variety of forms. For example, a government may lower taxes and reduce regulation to make hiring less costly. To address job opportunity disparities, a state or local government may hire workers. For example, city and county governments may hire residents to build roads, improve infrastructure, increase health care programs, bolster food security programs, expand housing security programs, expand education opportunities and hire public transportation drivers.

Turning Research into Real World Solutions

Job training is effective when jobs actually exist. We explore local economic development as part of our mission to ensure everyone a place in the workforce. The following research articles and resources can serve as a starting point for exploring a host of topics including: COVID-19 economic response and recovery1, rural entrepreneurship2, economic consolidation factor for rural tourism3, reviving tourism industry post-COVID-194, creating change by building partnership5, small-sized tourism projects in rural areas6, opportunity zones, equity and evaluation7,8,9, livelihoods with multiple stressors10, impact of Latinx first-generation college students' degree completion on their family in a US-Mexico border community11, rural young professionals12, and development conditions for family farming13.

REFERENCES

  1. COVID-19 Economic Response and Recovery: A Rapid Scoping Review. Farah N. Mawani, Virginia Gunn, Patricia O’Campo, Michelle Anagnostou, Carles Muntaner, Susitha Wanigaratne, Melissa Perri, Carolyn Ziegler and Angie An. 2021. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/00207314211002785
  2. Supporting Rural Entrepreneurship with Legal Technology. David Nows. 2020. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3668955
  3. Quality marks as an economic consolidation factor for rural tourism. Francisco Javier de la Ballina, Luis Valdés Peláez and Eduardo A. del Valle Tuero. 2021. https://addi.ehu.es/handle/10810/49761
  4. Reviving tourism industry post-COVID-19: A resilience-based framework. Gagan Deep, Sharma Asha, Thomas Justin Paul. 2021. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211973620301537
  5. Creative Placemaking: Creating Change by Building Partnerships. Jamie Levine Daniel and Mirae Kim. 2020. http://jpna.org/index.php/jpna/article/view/331
  6. Small-sized tourism projects in rural areas: the compounding effects on societal wellbeing. Burcin Hatipoglu, Bengi Ertuna and Duygu Salman. 2020. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09669582.2020.1784909
  7. Economic Opportunity & Resilience: Opportunity Zones & Equity. Daniel Figueroa. 2021. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3753669
  8. What it Will Take for Opportunity Zones to Create Real Opportunity in America's Economically Distressed Areas. Howard Wial. 2021. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3786408
  9. What is the Impact of Opportunity Zones on Employment Outcomes? Rachel M. B. Atkins, Pablo Hernandez-Lagos, Cristian Jara-Figueroa and Robert Seamans. 2020. https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3673986
  10. Livelihoods with multiple stressors: Gendered youth decision-making under global change in rural Northwest Mexico. Stephanie Buechler and América Lutz-Ley. 2019. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/2514848619878603
  11. Familia First! A Qualitative Study On The Impact Of Latinx First-Generation College Students' Degree Completion On Their Family In A US-Mexico Border Community. Luis Jaime Mendez. 2020. https://scholarworks.utep.edu/open_etd/3006/
  12. Sense of Community and Migration Intentions among Rural Young Professionals. Anna Wiederhold Wolfe, Laura W. Black and Howard T. Welser. 2019. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/ruso.12289
  13. Development Conditions for Family Farming: Lessons From Brazil. Gabriel Medina, Camila Almeidaa, Evandro Novaesa, Javier Godarb and Benno Pokorny. 2015. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0305750X15001412

Next Steps

100% New Mexico initiative participants are encouraged to form reading and discussion circles, providing a structure for community stakeholders to read and discuss articles and perspectives on strengthening all the systems that provide vital services. A “lunch and learn” series focused on each service sector, hosted by 100% New Mexico action teams, will not lack for reading material and research to enlighten, inspire and guide project development.

These references are useful for developing policy, learning experiences, course development, grant writing and other activities focused on ensuring ten vital services have the capacity to service 100% of county residents.